Why don’t they LISTEN?!

Towards the end of last year, a leader-manager, let’s call him Stanley, complained that however many times he gave an instruction and whatever format he put it in, no one paid any attention.

He was doing two things right: repetition and using multiple channels. Both help a message sink and and stay there. So what was he doing wrong?

We chatted for a while and four important elements of communication seemed to be missing from many of his messages.

  1. He didn’t give people a reason to listen – the tried and true WIFM, What’s In it For Me?
  2. He worded his messages in a way that meant something to him, but sadly, didn’t resonate with most of his team members.

     

  3. He focused more on problems and what was wrong than on solutions.
  4. His messages came across as orders rather than suggestions or helpful information.

The fact that Stanley is ‘old school’ and most of his team members were born in the 1980s and later didn’t help.

Stanley decided to make a belated New Year’s Resolution. He drew up the following checklist and committed to reviewing his important messages against it before speaking or putting them in writing.

___ Have I provided a reason to listen?

___ Have I used language and examples that my team can relate to?

___ Is my message positive?

___ Is my message helpful?

Quick, easy and powerful. Does it work? I caught up with Stanley the other day, and he says it does!

Advertisements

Seven ways to make your messages memorable

Whether you need to make a point about health and safety, establish a standard operating procedure, train a team member or introduce change, here’s how to make sure your messages hit home:

  1. Use positive language by stressing what you do want, not what you don’t want. For example, don’t say or write ‘Don’t go up an unsecured ladder on your own’, say or write ‘Always have someone hold the bottom of an unsecured ladder while climbing it’.
  2. Use a photograph or illustration when you can, because, as they say, ‘a picture is worth a thousand words’. For example, when your safety instructions or standard operating procedures say ‘Always have someone hold the bottom of an unsecured ladder while climbing it’, insert a photograph of two popular team members doing exactly that. (Because images stick in our minds, make sure the photo or diagram shows the right way, not the wrong way.)
  3. Write actively, not passively to keep the word count down and make your points more ‘alive’ and memorable. For example, ‘Always have someone hold the bottom of an unsecured ladder before climbing it’ is active and more interesting than ‘Unsecured ladders should always be held by another person while being climbed’. (You’d never say it like that, so why write it like that?)
  4. Keep your messages short and simple, and in the (polite) language of the workplace so they’re easily and quickly read and understood.
  5. Use the ‘you’ word: writing personally makes it clear your message is for the reader or listener. For example, you could write ‘You should always have someone hold the bottom of an unsecured ladder when you climb it’.
  6. Remember the WIFM—What’s In It for Me? Give people a reason to listen or read. For example, ‘For your own safety, always have someone hold the bottom of an unsecured ladder before climbing it’.
  7. Repeat your most important messages often, using different words, different examples and different mediums (e.g. computer screen savers, emails, face-to-face meetings, posters and Twitter).