Two heads are better than one

Whether you’re making decisions, innovating, developing plans or solving problems, the more the merrier is the go. Up to a point of course; too many cooks spoil the broth. But enough of cliches.

There is no doubt that people working together, directing their efforts towards the same endpoint, almost always do better than one lonely brain. Particularly when they are an assorted group, with different backgrounds, experiences, skills sets and all the rest of it. We all know that.

Why is it, then, that we so seldom act on what we know? Well, we’re all under pressure and involving people does take more time. But let’s face it, when you get a better result, that bit of extra time is worth it. Plus, the people you’ve involved have a better understanding of the situation and therefore greater commitment to the decision, innovation, plan or solution. Plus, when it’s your team you’re involving, it’s good for their development, both as individuals and as a team. ‘We’re all in this together’. ‘We the team’, in which there is no ‘I’. That makes your life a lot easier in the long run, too.

Of course, you don’t want to involve people when it’s just to rubber-stamp a decision or plan you’ve already made. Or so you get to lead a meeting that takes up everyone’s time and merely fills the room with warm, moist air. When people don’t care about the decision or plan or won’t be involved in implementing it or when it doesn’t affect them, don’t waste their time. And naturally, when time is really tight, you possibly can’t afford to involve people.

But that leaves a lot of other times when you are well advised to bring in the troops. When you have good people on your team — that is when you’ve recruited well, trained and developed them well, motivated and engaged them well — they probably have the skills and experience to help.

People often want to be involved, too. When you’re lucky, it’s because they care about the team or the organisation or their customers. Maybe it’s for their own personal development. Maybe it’s because they know they can make a positive contribution. Maybe they’d rather sit in with a group than get on with their own job. When that latter reason is the case, leave that person out of the loop, because you want people who can add value to your decision, innovation, plan or solution.

You should almost always include people who are affected by your decision, plan, innovation or solution and people who you need to help you implement it willingly and enthusiastically. When you need people’s acceptance and support, invite them to the party, too.

So there we are. You know it and I know it. Two heads are better than one. Act on what you know.

 

 

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