Dealing with a crisis

Fashion gurus say to wear clothes that are in proportion to your figure. That’s good advice for dealing with a crisis, too — keep it in proportion. Don’t panic, because that’s when you’re likely to make matters worse. And don’t stick your finger in the proverbial dyke and pretend you’ve dealt with it, because that makes it likely that it will blow up in your face sooner or later.

Take a deep breath and assess the situation. You need to get out of your ‘reptilian brain’ and into your ‘thinking brain’. Once you’re there, you can decide what you need to do – right now – to minimise the fallout and get on the road to recovery. For example, if a project is in danger of missing a deadline, maybe you can offer some incentives to speed things up, bring someone in to help with the workload, or eliminate some of the non-essential tasks in order to get back on track.

Now analyse. What actually has happened? How many people, and who, are affected and how are they affected? What assumptions are you making? What are the key variables? What is the most important issue, the one that by solving it, will significantly remove or diminish the others?

Next, plan.What are your objectives for resolving the major issue? What actions do you need to take to achieve those objectives? How can you assess your success? What other action can you take to remedy the situation or at least, make it ‘less bad’? When the crisis is a hum dinger, you might want to develop some best-case, worst-case and most-likely-case scenarios and develop plans for those.

A good plan helps you act confidently and effectively, especially when you’ve protected it with a force field analysis to capitalise on the forces working to help your plan succeed and mitigate or remove the forces working against your plan’s success.

Let your stakeholders know what’s going on and what your recovery plan is. They may have some good ideas to add and some other perspectives to consider. When the crisis is your fault, a sincere apology is a smart move.

When you have time to catch your breath, figure out what caused the crisis in the first place – not to lay blame but so that you can make sure a similar crisis never happens again.

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